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Medieval philosophy philosophy theology Thomas Aquinas

All God’s Instruments

 

Memoria College tutor Thomas Cothran, writing at Eclectic Orthodoxy, about St. Thomas Aquinas’ position on the problem of predestination:

God causes all of our actions, including our acts of choosing. He does not merely give mankind the power of choice, he causes the act of choosing itself. We are mere instruments of God’s will. Such is the view of St. Thomas Aquinas. But St. Thomas also believes that human beings choose freely, and that the dependence of human volition in its every movement on God does not violate human freedom. On its face, St. Thomas’ view appears paradoxical, even contradictory. And yet a number of recent religious thinkers appeal to the medieval Dominican in their own attempts to reconcile divine providence and human freedom.

The discussion in the over fifty responses to the article is also worth reading. You can read it here.

Categories
Atheism Bertrand Russell Christianity Existence of God Frederick Copleston

The Most Famous Debate on the Existence of God

An excellent article on one of the great modern philosophical events:

On January 28, 1948, the BBC brought together two of the century’s brightest minds for a radio debate about the existence of God. To be sure, the debaters were not just lightweight showboats, blowing off steam. The two men represented the cream of the intellectual crop.

Bertrand Russell was a renowned British philosopher, mathematician, historian, and perhaps the world’s leading atheist at the time. He authored many skeptical essays and books, including the collection still popular today, Why I Am Not a Christian

Read the rest here.